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Mother’s Day 2019 aka 5/12/19

 

What I liked about mother’s day 2019, compared to previous mother’s days, is the emergence of literature (social media and my trusty newspaper) that not everyone is happy on happy mother’s day. I needed this reminder. For some people, it really sucks. “Be careful about your boasting” was the message I received. So hard when I live and breathe and sometimes gag over their every movement. So hard when I spend 364 days trying to shape them into thinkers, doers, college-bound, and nice-to-Mom and on day #365 I get a card that says MOM upside down is WOW. So hard not to share. But I deeply respect the silent sadness that is out there. How I wish I could say I-SEE-YOU to all of you.  Today was 5/12/19. Call it what YOU want.

2019 also had a plethora of articles on “How To Spend Mother’s Day.” Every article had the same message: “Any way you want.” Sometimes it said: “Any way you f@#$-ing want.” Either way, message received. I had the day off, so my requests were: sleep in, long run, chill with kiddos (with tag-out privileges at any moment), then dash to a store or two or three. For the most part, it worked out! Handmade gifts and cards are just what the doctor of pharmacy ordered and it was perfect. I even found myself alone with my coveted Sunday Chicago Tribune with a hot coffee for 30 minutes. And then it happened: I read a story that I shouldn’t have. I saw the headline and knew better – I should have turned the page. But I read the darn story. Chicago-land recently lost a young child, at the hands of his parents, and it’s been heart-wrenching and gut-wrenching and makes me want to scream and shout and let it all out. I’ve purposely been avoiding the updates and NPR in the car because I just can’t handle those kinds of details. Especially not on my commutes. Because if I listen, I won’t be able to hold back the sorrow for this child that I’ve been pushing down inside. But today, on mother’s day 2019, I read the full article. And I let the sobs come. The kind which causes shoulders to shake, nose to run, and dogs to come lean. I was alone with the heavy Tribune, my heavy luke-warm coffee, and my heavy dog. Everything was heavy and I was alone and the moment eventually passed.

My daughter returned from gymnastics and remembered she forgot one more gift in her backpack: a glass jar filled with 20 reasons why she loves me. Happy tears. (Who gives young children glass jars?) Soon the tribune article was in my rearview mirror, my coffee forgotten, and the dog disappeared. So many times as pharmacists we get a glimpse into someone’s home life. We hear how loved ones talk to one another, we squinch at the humiliation, and pray there’s no fear. We know that with trust comes stories. From patients, students, and technicians. Everyday we make the decision whether or not to engage, inquire, and invest our emotional and professional reserves.  The reserves saved for our own stuff and our families’ stuff. Some of us are brave and scared and go in anyway. Some of us skate along the line we’ve drawn in the sand.

We often don’t know what to do if we suspect neglect, abuse, or mistreatment. My colleague and I have been teaching a women’s health elective for years and we always include a class on domestic violence. We invite a guest speaker from a local shelter or support agency to speak to the pharmacy students about how we can help. She gives us tools, such as conversation starters and resources, to use when the time is right. I’ll write more on this in the future because it deserves more time and space but fittingly for today, we are reminded of those mothers who don’t have choices. I’m so freaking thankful that I am celebrating mother’s day 2019, because it reminds me that love overcomes hate and the good tears overcome the sorrowful ones. I’m thankful that I was able to choose how I wanted to spend mother’s day 2019, not just the activities, but because it served as a reminder of a real choice that stems from an equitable partner team. I’m thankful that my parents made this visible for me and in turn, I hope my own children remember this. For moms of fallen children, for the moms who feel helpless, for the moms who feel boastful, for the moms in prison, for the moms without partners, for the moms in our hearts – today was 5/12/19 – you get to call it what you want.

Brooke

Superheroic: A Blog for Moms with a Pharmacy Twist

Be.superheroic@gmail.com

Pharmacist by day…but by night?

Pharmacist by day…but by night?

Gunda Siska

 

 

For years I lived a double life to escape the monotony that was my reality. As a pharmacist, drugs/alcohol was not really an option, at least not with all the drug testing going on in the work place. It led me to my guilty pleasure, my escape, my way of checking out mentally. That led me to writing fictional novels.

 I often wrote when I was on vacation at my lake house. Of course everyone was having a good time frolicking in the sun, swimming etc. But after decades of growing up in that environment, I had been there done that. That too was boring. Everything was boring. 

Even playing Candyland for hours was boring. I love spending time with my children and family but I needed something more.

While doing these mindless activities, I would be concurrently day dreaming about the next chapter in my novel. My mind would fill up with scenarios for the book. At night when everyone was a sleep, I would write. I lived my life like this for years, on and off.

However, I never had the courage to publish my novels, until now. This novel was a mental escape to the happiest time of my life=college. I turned the fictional scenario into a learning experience. This story is what I wish I could have told my younger self. It’s about finding happiness (book description below)

I also went on to write a salacious political novel. It is about how I would run the country given the opportunity to improve it. I wrote that novel after I had read 50 shades of Gray. I wondered, why is this author a multi-millionaire and I’m an unappreciated pharmacist feeling abused. I thought I could write a better novel than 50 shades of gray, and so I attempted to do so. I allowed myself to go down the path of erotic scenarios. But when the book was completed, I felt like I had sold my soul. 

The main character in the book was not how I was. Maybe portions of me were in the main character as well as the other characters, but it definitely did not represent my life.

I still contemplate deleting that novel. No one has read it in its entirety. I’m not sure it would be well received. We’ll see how the first novel does. But until then, I have completely given up my secret life of writing novels. I now live in the moment. I pay attention. I live and learn and make corrections. I now solve my problems instead of ignore them and hope they go away on their own. 

And the good news is…that once I started living in the movement, paying attention to my life, and solving my problems….my life became better. Happier. More successful in every. way.

I now write medical articles, and my pharmacy career has never been brighter. I think it is become I’m now more engaged with my career. I’m more connected with the other pharmacists around me. I am able to empathize and understand the people around me better.

Question: Should I use my real name when publishing this book? or a penname? I don’t want it to discredit my medical articles and books in anyway. Karen Berger has read my book in its entirety and says I should be proud of my book, and not use a penname. Karen believes honesty is the best policy, and the truth always comes out in the end. IDK. Any thoughts?

 

Update: Gunda has published her novel under the name of GK Siska and it can be found at this link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/109619824X?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860or https://www.amazon.com/dp/109619824X?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

The Space In Between Chapters

The Space In Between Chapters

 

A few big things happened recently:

  1. I donated BINS of baby/toddler items
  2. My son received his first phone call from a friend “just to talk”
  3. The pharmacy profession is causing panic at the disco

A local church was accepting donations for clothes and toys and for the first time, I entered the corner of the basement and pushed aside the cobwebs of the attic looking for bins. I blame my restlessness, Marie Kondo, and my husband for this urge to purge. Opening those bins brought back a flood of memories – holding some outfits pushed all of my maternal buttons and holding some toys had me singing along to our favorite songs. You know it’s time for the stuff to go when your kids see the piles and say, “Yeah, I’m good with that.” It took me a long time to sort, feel, reminisce, and pack 10 boxes full of stuff. On donation day, I loaded the car and ran back to the house to grab the last box when my son says, “So-And-So is calling your phone tonight!” “Oh really! How did they get my number?” I ask. “From the school directory that was sent home,” he answers confidently. My first thought was wow, So-And-So is so resourceful! Wait, what are they going to talk about? The phone rings, he grabs it, and he runs in the other room. I look at my husband in disbelief and say, “What’s happening?”

There’s no time to discuss as I’ve got to make it to the church before 7:30pm. After I unload the boxes, I drive away slowly, as if the volunteers will call me back saying the infant tutu outfit is too cute and I must keep it. I roll down the windows and soak in the last few minutes of an almost perfect (i.e. rare) weather day in Chicago. The warm wind on the way to the church now felt cool against the tears coming down my cheeks – as I say goodbye to one chapter, filled with baby smells, cute outfits, and lots of firsts– and anxiously think about the next chapter – to be filled with phone calls, awkward moments, and lots of firsts. On that drive home, I think about feeling in between two phases of motherhood. The transition from single digit to double digit birthdays. The growth in the width of their shoulders, the length of their feet, and the breadth of their independence. I think of the coincidence of my son receiving his first phone call on the same night I’m letting go of his baby clothes. I believe that saved me from having a complete sob attack. After a few hot tears, I realized I have a big kid who needs me to clear my attic AND my perceptions of a little boy disguised in a big boy shell.

Of course this makes me think about work (we can’t help ourselves, right?). Feeling in between chapters is the best way to describe how I’ve felt in the past when I’ve changed clinics. Similar to baby clothes, I remember donating materials I no longer needed and being grateful for that experience while anxiously awaiting my next pharmacy home. Some of us are between jobs or fear we may be there soon. Some of us have outgrown current conditions yet nervous to make a career move. Some of us can’t imagine working anywhere else yet the current climate encourages one’s imagination. These transitional periods are so tough. We’re planners, after all, and the future needs us. But in what ways?

Our very own founder of pharmacistmomsgroup.com, Suzy Soliman, PharmD, BCMAS, explained the why behind her career switch. She said, “Having kids meant that my 90 minute commute wasn’t an option anymore and I needed to find a better fit for the “new” me. I loved what I was doing but I knew that my children and family needed me more so I resigned from my “dream” job as an associate dean and had to find myself once again.”

 

I find it interesting that some events in life force us to move on to the next chapter, whether we’re ready or not. The panic in pharmacy is widespread and impactful decisions are made every day. Feeling so out of control, how do we navigate this space as working moms? I reached out to my friend, Mary Heidkamp, PhD and Executive Coach,* to help answer this really easy (not) question. She put the power in our hands. And she gets right to it: “You don’t have to save your organization. That’s not on you. If you’re in a role that’s not professionally satisfying, you have two choices: stay or start looking- and there’s reasons to do either. As moms with high-level careers, we desire fulfilling careers AND hands-on motherhood. Maybe your job is not fulfilling but it’s suiting your family well at the moment. Maybe it offers flexibility, hours that work well, and benefits you need. Maybe the craving for more satisfying work weighs more than that, so you start looking. YOU have the choice.”

Suzy opened up about her own transitions between jobs. “I was scared. I didn’t even know where to start. I spent my entire career in Chicago and didn’t know anyone on the east coast and had little connections. I loved my job but I knew that moving 800 miles away was going to force me to look for a new job. I still needed to pass my boards for a new state; the hardest part was believing I could take an exam almost 10 years later. It wasn’t easy.”

Here’s the superheroic plan: Let’s make a pack not to rush through transitions. If we take a step back and reflect on how far we’ve come, at home or work, maybe we can ease into the next chapter with more gratitude and grace. Let’s give ourselves time (in my case: years) to be ready to say goodbye to things that are just things. Let’s give ourselves mental space to process everything that’s going on at work.  Let’s give ourselves credit when we actually DO let go of things we don’t need and let go of momentum that can’t change. When we find ourselves in the spaces in between chapters, let’s just breathe and give ourselves a moment to cogitate over what’s really important at the intersection of home and work.

Suzy adds, “What I learned is change is good. It has helped me to grow. Helped me become a better pharmacist. It helped me make new friends. New connections. I am now comfortable with being uncomfortable.”

Brooke

Superheroic: A Blog for Moms with a Pharmacy Twist

Be.superheroic@gmail.com

* http://dynamic-insights.com/

 

94 Seconds – The Smallest Things Can Make The Biggest Impact

By Karen Berger, PharmD

On Friday after school, my 10-year old had an expander put in, as the beginning of her teeth straightening process. The orthodontist has a great bedside manner, and was very patient with my daughter, Dena. She took her time and really wanted Dena to get as comfortable as she could be under the circumstances. Our appointment was at 3:30 pm and we left around 4:45 – we definitely did not feel rushed.

After dinner, around 7:30pm, I was sitting by my phone when it rang. Who is calling me? I thought, surprised. Everyone texts me! Lo and behold, it was the orthodontist, calling to see how Dena was doing in the last few hours since we left the office. We chatted briefly – I didn’t want to keep her long, especially on a Friday night. She asked a few questions and offered some advice. When we hung up, I looked at the phone. The conversation only took 94 seconds. 94 seconds!!

 

Why did I notice this? Because it only took 94 seconds to make an amazing impression on us. It is so rare that a healthcare provider of any kind makes after hours calls to check on patients. But that 94 seconds really made a difference to me. I saw this orthodontist as someone who cared and went the extra mile for her patients and their families.

 

Then, as with many other things, I thought about how this could apply to pharmacy. I certainly know most of us don’t have any extra time to do anything, but I think we can all find 94 seconds here and there to check in on a patient that may need a little extra attention. Throughout your days, and your interactions with patients, you’ll most certainly notice a few patients that have issues you could follow up on with a quick phone call. Maybe someone is looking a little down, and you could be the quick call that turns that patient’s day around.

 

Forget the metrics, let the reds go redder! Take just a minute or two here and there, and go that extra mile. We are all in this because we want to help people. Let’s all take a brief moment as often as we can, to make a little difference in our patients’ lives. You never know when your quick phone call could brighten someone’s day – the smallest things can make the biggest impact.

Being a Mum as well as a pharmacy student

 

 

 

Being a Mum as well as a pharmacy student

By:

Nour Morjan

I have been a university student for about 7 years, and this is my eighth. I became a mum while I was in my fourth year at the university. I changed my course twice, from Biotechnology engineering to Genetics and Molecular Biology to finally Pharmacy.

I started my MPharm course being a mum. As much as being a mum is wonderful and is a blessing that doesn’t make the struggle any easier.

Now I’m on my final year, I could say being a student is more than a full-time job for me and being a mum is a 24-hour job.

During my time at the university while being a mum, I lacked the support to help me overcome those difficulties and I had to make it on my own. Although, I had the full support of my husband, we both needed support and help in what we went through.

At the start, I thought it was just me going through all of that. I thought maybe as a mum, I was not capable of raising a child. The doubts took control over me, and I already have had depression and anxiety which was a separate issue for me that affected my life a lot.

There are some students in my course who are parents. As the course progressed, we started sharing the struggle we go through together. We talked about  how hard it is to juggle between house work, childcare, cooking and social life which seemed impossible.

I started to think that it wasn’t just me but all of us, students with children, are in the same boat struggling together without knowing anything about each other’s struggle.

A few months went by and then I came across Pharmacy Podcast Network on Instagram and through it I came across the lovely Pharmacist Suzanne Soliman from Chicago, USA. She is the founder of Pharmacist Moms as you already all know. I got inspired by her, so I tried looking online to find something similar in the UK which supports pharmacist mums, but I couldn’t. Instead I found how pharmacists can help new parents and mothers.

 

I contacted Suzanne and now we are going to work together to start a branch of Pharmacist Moms in the UK.

 

Very excited 🙂

Find Your Skinny Black Microphone: Advocacy As Pharmacists and Moms

Find Your Skinny Black Microphone: Advocacy As Pharmacists and Moms

 

On 3/6/19 my colleague and fellow pharmacist mom, Kathy Vest, PharmD, CDE, BCACP, and I met in a parking garage at 5:30am. With bellies full of coffee, pączkis, and butterflies, we drove 2.5 hours to Springfield, IL.  We were invited by the Illinois Pharmacists Association (IPhA)* to attend a committee hearing for HB 1442 (contraceptive prescribing bill) as ‘clinical experts.’  Yes, surreal! When you get this type of call, how could you say no? So I confirmed that my husband could take the kids to school, put on a blazer, and pushed my imposter syndrome aside.

In the 17 years I’ve lived in Illinois, I had never gone to Springfield. The day before, the nurse practitioner I work with said, “Good luck down there. It’s a one-horse kind of town.” I had never been to a committee hearing or even seen one on TV. The building is beautiful – if you are fan of architecture, Abraham Lincoln paintings, and marble columns for days, then check this place out. The committee hearing was in a small room with rows of chairs for the public, a small table with three seats for the presenters and 5 rows of tables with comfy chairs for the representatives. Each seat had a skinny black microphone on the table, with a push button to activate a green light alerting you, “It’s go time.” With ~30 lawyers and ~30 bystanders watching us, waiting for us to speak, my mind shuffled between ‘You know this stuff, it’s no sweat!’ and ‘How did I get here?’

I knew HB 1442 pretty well, as I participated in a couple of conference calls with the sponsor a year earlier. Since it was first introduced three years ago, Representative Michelle Mussman (with the help of IPhA) has been trying to get this bill passed. That morning she said to us, “It’s just been passed in the 10th state. We could have been 3rd.” Kathy and I been learning and conducting research on pharmacist prescribed contraception for the past few years. We know the pros and cons. We know some pharmacists are excited and some pharmacists are apprehensive. We knew clinical questions would come our way. We suspected the lack of an age limit in the bill would spark some debate. What we didn’t expect was for a woman’s age to the deal-breaker for so many voting representatives. Together with Rep. Mussman, the OBGYN physician to her left, and our IPhA representative, we explained that women of all ages are currently obtaining contraception – from their physician or online. If this bill is passed, a patient wouldn’t have to wait for a doctor’s appointment or a package to come in the mail. Rep. Mussman explained the potential negative medical and socioeconomic outcomes of an unplanned teen pregnancy. I’m happy to report that not one lawyer questioned a pharmacist’s ability to provide this service. At one point, a representative asked me, “So you are willing to take responsibility if you dispense the wrong/inappropriate medication?”  And I said, “Yes, just like I take that responsibility on a daily basis.”

The bill passed this committee hearing and is now on its way to the House floor! I felt like I did my duty – as a pharmacist and as a woman. I felt empowered that our voices matter. I felt American. I left thinking, why did it take me 17 years to drive to Springfield? I reached out to Laura Licari, PharmD, current president of IPhA, for her insight on this topic. She reassured me that advocacy at the state level was not always at the front of her mind (phew, I’m normal). She started her journey with IPhA when her mentor asked her to serve on the Board of Directors, which she wouldn’t have considered if not for that push (women helping women=love!). When I asked her what sparks advocacy, she told me, “When you realize that the Pharmacy Practice Act dictates your scope of practice, you also realize that every pharmacist has the power within them to advocate for change to that scope of practice through the legislative process.” When I ask her about a pharmacist’s limited time for advocacy, she admits its hard to keep up (I’m beginning to think Laura really gets me). She informed me that both IPhA and ICHP are monitoring over 6,000 proposed bills. She said, “If you feel like you don’t have the time or the expertise, make an investment with your membership. In doing so, your organization can sift through all those bills and alert you to the ones that are most relevant to your practice and profession; also you can build a diverse network of pharmacy professionals. Over time, just like me, you’ll learn about the legislative process and how you can affect change. Until then, your contribution helps both IL state associations attend meetings with legislators, organize Pharmacy Legislative Day, and monitor that long list of bills that can potentially help or harm our profession.”

My experience in Springfield made me think of how much advocacy we do DAILY as moms – for our families and ourselves. Phone calls to schools, networking on the playground, and negotiating who gets Mom’s laptop first are just a few examples. There have been times when I didn’t press the button on the skinny black microphone at home. There have been times when I CHOSE not to advocate for myself. Nervous to speak up, unsure how much it would help in the long run, and confused by the newness of motherhood – there have been silent times. Thankfully it didn’t take me 17 years to realize that in order to have MY needs and desires met, I needed to speak into the mic. I’ve hustled to obtain childcare when I need to exercise – even at 4:45am! I’ve explained to my kids how important my career is to my overall health – and their wellbeing. I’ve asked for alone time and tried not to let the guilt pull me back into the driveway.

I asked my colleague and friend, Kathy, who was with me in Springfield, if she thinks there are parallels between MOM and PHARM advocacy. She said, “A few things I’ve learned about being a Mom are that 1) I wear a lot of hats as a Mom and that can be challenging (house manager, school volunteer, basketball coach, etc), 2) there is no rule book for how to be a great Mom, 3) being a Mom often comes with feelings of vulnerability, and most important, 4) I am not alone in feeling like this!  Being a mom has shown me the importance of community and supporting each other since it can be one of the hardest, yet most wonderful aspects of our lives. Involvement with pharmacy organizations has been a great way to communicate my ideas, perspectives and experiences, as well as learn from those of other pharmacists.  And recently getting involved with legislative efforts has shown me that we all have the potential to contribute and how critical our voices are to help important causes to move forward!

Here’s the superheroic takeaway: Going to Springfield reminded me that in all aspects of our lives, there is a skinny black microphone with a button ready for you to push it. When the green light is on, well, you already know what to say.

Brooke

Superheroic: A Blog for Moms with a Pharmacy Twist (be.superheroic@gmail.com)

*Are you a pharmacist practicing in Illinois?  The Illinois Pharmacists Association is offering a 10% discount for new members, courtesy of Laura Licari. FYI: she’s only the 7th woman IPhA president since 1880! Use code PRES10 at www.ipha.org.

 

Upskill and Reskill

 

Upskill and Reskill

I have a lovely author friend who writes about how to succeed at work now and in the future. Recently we were discussing life and writing and her new book* and she casually said two words that made me put my food down: upskill and reskill. And now I’m wondering how I lived so long without this phrase in my life. She explained it so eloquently as I feverously took notes circa 1999. [Remember the ‘there’s no handout’ kind of writing? Ah, the pen cramps we would get. All the loose-leaf paper we would buy…memories]

She defined it as:

Upskill: Take your existing level of expertise and widen it.

Reskill: Learn something different.

I can’t stop thinking about how this applies to pharmacists. What additional skills interest you? What additional training have you been thinking about for a while? This venture may or may not directly impact your current work situation, but it may be a futuristic pursuit. There are pharmacist moms in this group who are doing this very thing and posting about it: completing a pharmacogenomics course, MTM training, joining a new professional organization, and studying for board certification. Learning new skills in new environments offers advantages such as networking and diversifying our talent base. The goal is to reinvent ourselves by upscaling and rescaling our foundation.

Sandra Leal, PharmD, MPH, CDE, FAPhA is currently CEO of SinfoníaRx®, running as a candidate for president-elect of APhA, AND a fellow pharmacist mom. I met her in person a few years ago and she is honestly one of the most down-to-earth people I have met in this field. So let’s talk upskill and reskill. She pursued a Masters in Public Health as a personal goal. She told me, “I noted that helping people one to one was really impactful but I wanted to impact population health by addressing system issues and policy to address the repeating problems that every patient would walk in with. So many times we feel like we have to accept a broken system instead of feeling empowered to change it.”

Another pharmacist mom, Mitzi Wasik, PharmD, FAMCP, FCCP, BCPS is currently Senior Director, Patient Safety and Quality at Aetna and current president of AMCP, reflected on how she navigated this as her career shifted. She started with anticoagulation, diabetes, and immunization certificates early in her career when she was heavily involved in direct patient care, and she then pursued BCPS certification in order to stay competitive in the market as an ambulatory care pharmacist. She notes that these credentials led to a higher salary after a job change. What’s she doing right now? She told me, “Right now I am getting my MBA which is helping me from a business acumen perspective.  My position is less clinical these days but I have to be able to walk and talk the business perspective of clinical programs to tie it all together.”

I know what you’re thinking. You don’t have time to pursue any new skills or another degree. At the end of the day, the last thing you want to do is interact with more people. You may feel that new talents wouldn’t be valued by your current organization.

Here’s my hypothesis about this group: you value this profession more than numbers and money. You value yourself more than any metric that attempts to define you. You want to upskill and reskill, but you’re not sure how and when and what.

Here’s what I know about this group: We have an advantage. We are used to squeezing in really important tasks into tiny pockets of time. We practically invented multitasking. (And yes, we agree with the research – it doesn’t work well). We juggle more in one hour than most people do in a week. Ok, that seems magnified but whether it’s real or exaggerated – it impacts our mindset on whether we should add something else to our plate. Upskilling and reskilling will no doubt force adjustments to our already full schedules.

Here’s the superheroic plan: For moms with littles and moms with teens and moms with olders; for any moms who have less than zero minutes to devote to something new: use this information as a jumpstart to think about what’s next. Take care of your babies. Take care of yourself. But during your commute and while you’re waiting in line and when you’re up at 3am – think about what you would do to upskill and reskill your career. Keep thinking about it, let it marinate in your mind, and remember Sandra Leal’s words of wisdom: “Don’t put things off. There will never be a better time to invest in yourself than now and your family will be better for it.”

Brooke Griffin

Be.superheroic@gmail.com

*www.alexandralevit.com

An angry customer shot me #silentnomore

 

According to OSHA “between 2011-2013, workplace assaults ranged from 23,540-25,630 annually with 70-74% occurring in healthcare and social service settings. For healthcare workers assaults account for 10-11% of workplace injury versus 3% of all private sector employees.” This is UNACCEPTABLE and as the founder of Pharmacist Moms, I will be #silentnomore. Yesterday a pharmacist and a pharmacy technician were SHOT and are currently in the hospital. As health care providers, we must demand from our leadership more protocols and zero tolerance for any form of violence. This is not new to healthcare and we need to bring light to this situation. My thoughts and prayers for the victims and pharmacy staff and the patients of the pharmacy. Pharmacists play a unique role in healthcare and are caregivers and oftentimes similar to other healthcare providers have a difficult time taking legal action against patients, but we should. We will be #silentnomore

 

 

Superheroic: A Blog for Moms with a Pharmacy Twist

Superheroic: A Blog for Moms with a Pharmacy Twist


Dr. Brooke Griffin

Hey Mamas! Do you ever feel the push and pull of motherhood and work thrusting you around like you’re standing in a wave pool? Do you ever wonder how you’re able to juggle so many balls in the air, then watch a ball (or two or three) drop, and somehow manage to bounce back? Do you ever waver between feeling inept and superheroic? Same here.

Hi, I’m Brooke! I’m a pharmacist. I’m a mom. I’ve worked full-time, part-time, and job share. I’ve worked in community pharmacy, ambulatory care, hospital-based clinics, patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and last but not least academia. Besides being a pharmacist mom, some other things I love: Celebrating our differences! Asking bold questions! Sports! Life and all its imperfections! Writing! Ice Cream! Using explanation points!

Have you ever been told that trying to juggle a career with being a hands-on mom would be challenging? I remember thinking, “Challenge Accepted!” as I don’t like to be pushed around (except by small children, but you probably already guessed that). I certainly don’t have all of this figured out, but I’ve been soaking in guidance and advice from talented and superheroic moms with careers, including my own mama. I don’t know about you, but I’m constantly reevaluating my experience. The growing pains are filled with joy, sacrifice, and blurred lines. Oh, and stretch marks.
Each month I’ll be posting riveting, groundbreaking, and superfunny blogs about mom stuff and work stuff and this-is-how-we’re-killing-it stuff. Ok, ok; you’Il be the judge of funny. I’ll be using this space to interview pharmacist moms (and a few non-pharmacist moms – hey, Mom!) and my hope is to ask the Yodas of our world for some wisdom. I believe that all of the million little imperfect pieces of our lives actually create a wild yet beautiful mosaic. I tell my children that this is my gift to them and then they ask for screen time instead. As we muscle our way through the days and those unforgettable nights, let’s talk about the good, the bad, the gritty, and the creative ways we work.

As I get to know you and you get to know me, let’s survive together Oregon Trail style, without the cholera but probably with the exhaustion. I don’t have work-life balance – that scale broke a long time ago. But I’ve got a vision for a network of pharmacist moms who know that sometimes, just getting through the day can feel pretty damn superheroic. Let’s celebrate that.

Brooke
Be.superheroic@gmail.com

A Career Beyond the Counter:

A Career Beyond the Counter:

My experience transitioning from retail pharmacy to the corporate world

 

By Ursula Chizhik VP of Quality and Regulatory Affairs, FLAVORx

 

I was a retail pharmacist for 11 years before joining the FLAVORx team.  Never in my life did I envision myself working in a corporate setting, where I would be sitting in my very own office, wearing a nice outfit with high heel shoes, taking a lunch break, and working less than 12 hours standing on my feet! I was so used to a lab coat, my comfortable Clarks clogs, eating quickly while standing, and arriving and leaving the pharmacy when it was dark outside- That’s simply what I thought the life of a retail pharmacist was destined to be.  But that all changed when I called FLAVORx out of the blue and asked if they needed a pharmacist on staff.

There was no job posting, only my desire to seek out a new opportunity and my familiarity with the company name, since I used to flavor prescriptions when I was a pharmacist. I was ready for a change and while I didn’t know exactly what I had to offer to FLAVORx, I knew I was a dedicated pharmacist with a lot of experience and, surely, I could bring something valuable to the table.

Fast forward 7 years and I can tell you I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.  I love my job and the fact that I can integrate my many years of practical pharmacy experience to bring an element of “real world pharmacy” to the company I work for and the people I work with.  I know what it’s like to be a pharmacy student.  I have experienced the peaks and valleys of being a pharmacist behind the counter.  I tap into those experiences every day as we discuss effective ways to reach out to pharmacy students, encourage technicians, and connect with pharmacists and other health care providers.

Working for a small business, I feel especially valued and valuable for the credentials I’ve earned and the experiences I’ve gained, which is tremendously rewarding and a big difference from some of the retail pharmacy jobs I held.

As some of you may be considering a career move at some point in your future, I thought it would be helpful to share a few things that I learned after getting out from behind the counter:

Time management-

This was probably the biggest adjustment for me during my transition from retail pharmacist to business person.  In the pharmacy setting, everything has a sense of urgency. We need to get prescriptions ready quickly and patients out the door as soon as possible, if we want to keep customers happy. This fast pace was simply an integral part of the job.  On the contrary, in the office setting, I feel like you are constantly waiting for someone to respond to an email, a unanimous decision to be made, a delivery to arrive, a colleague to do their job.  This waiting game is quite different from the constant scrambling and running around at the pharmacy, but most of the time this is a welcome change.

Meetings-

Meetings, meetings, and more meetings! Business people like to spend a lot of time talking about ideas- collaborating or brainstorming as they call it. While in theory it seems like a great idea to get a group of bright people in a room to determine the next big thing for your company, the next direction, the next initiative, there is generally more discussion than decision-making!  Although if you have a meeting that runs into lunchtime, there will likely be a free food!

Personalities-

Just like in every work environment, you must learn to deal with many different personalities. Although, behind the counter you are typically dealing with people of the same educational background- all pharmacists and technicians who speak the pharmacy language. In a business setting, you are dealing with a variety of people from broad educational backgrounds that do not speak the same language.  At any given moment, you may find yourself working with the sales team, the marketing team, the finance team, the engineering team, and maybe even the CEO. Needless to say, every individual or team has their own perspective and priorities, which don’t always align. I’ve learned that you can’t always make everyone happy, so its best to stay in your lane, but remain open minded and flexible.

My role at FLAVORx has evolved over the years, and with every passing year, I have taken on more responsibilities and have truly enjoyed the opportunity to create such a unique, flexible, and rewarding job that works for me and my family. Best of all, working at a company like FLAVORx allows me to still be part of the pharmacy world, even though I am no longer in a traditional pharmacy setting. If anyone is considering a career beyond the pharmacy counter, I would be more than happy to give you some advice. Feel free to email me or connect with me on LinkedIn.